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Ads and advertising on your comic, for #webcomicchat

Ads and advertising on your comic, for #webcomicchat published on No Comments on Ads and advertising on your comic, for #webcomicchat

An extended versions of last Sunday’s chat, since I didn’t have time to go into all the detail I wanted.

(…mostly because I was in a moving car with spotty Internet access.)

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Q1: Does your webcomic have ads? If not, would you ever consider getting some?

Yes, on both comics, because why not?

This is when some creators talk about Having Pure Motives and Providing The Best Experience. Thing is, as a reader, I’ve never found ads distracting or disruptive on anyone else’s comics. Not to mention, I can’t afford to directly support a ton of artists and writers, so it’s nice to know that at least my presence is doing something good for them.

For people who really can’t put up with ads, even for the sake of supporting indie creators, and haven’t developed the ability to tune them out…there’s always AdBlock.

Q2: What ad sites do you know of or use to earn revenue for your comics?

I use Project Wonderful, because it’s easy, automated, and works no matter how big your site is.

(Services like Google AdSense have a minimum traffic threshold. PW just gives people the ability to advertise on low-traffic sites for free, if nobody else is bidding.)

It doesn’t make a lot of money, just enough that I can turn it around and funnel it back into…

Q3: Do you advertise your webcomic? Do you use paid ads? Do you promote yourself using free strategies?

…buying PW ads. I’ve never actually withdrawn money from PW and spent it anywhere else. Set up a good campaign and it’ll be a reliable source of traffic.

The trick is to make lots of different banners, compare their performance, and cull the ones that nobody ever clicks on. If you set up a campaign that aims for cheap ad space on low-traffic sites, you can use that data to pinpoint the banners that really get attention, and use those in higher-cost campaigns.

PW lets you target by keywords, too. You’ll get a noticeably higher click-through rate if you search for, say, gay/LGBT sites, and then bid on them with your “romantic scenes with the m/m couple” banners.

I shelled out for banner ads on TopWebComics once. The admins actually screwed up the initial display date, so they were very apologetic and gave me a bunch of extra slots for free. It was nice, but not noticeably better than PW.

Free strategies: crossposting on DA/Twitter/Tumblr/Facebook, sharing with general-interest groups and blogs like lgbtwebcomics, urging readers to vote on TWC, the occasional fanart piece for someone else’s webcomic, and, lately, guest posts on LGBTQ Reads.

Q4: What techniques for earning ad revenue do you use, besides banner ads?

The only one that comes to mind is product placement, so…nothing.

Non-ad revenue comes from Patreon, commissions, and books/merchandise.

Q5: What is the most notable ad experience that you’ve ever encountered as a publisher and/or advertiser?

I’ve had to nix a couple of individual ads. One was a straight-up scam — it got reported and the user was removed. The other image wasn’t TOS-breaking, it just had a joke that didn’t look good next to a comic full of LGBT characters, so it got blocked from bidding on my sites.

It’s nice that PW makes that kind of filtering easy. (On top of the usual broad filtering for “child-friendly” on one end and “NSFW” on the other.)

Comments, for #WebcomicChat

Comments, for #WebcomicChat published on No Comments on Comments, for #WebcomicChat

Took a break from remastering BICP chapter 7 this afternoon, to talk about comments at @WebcomicChat.

(I’m also more than halfway through re-uploading And Shine Heaven Now to the new site with comments enabled! Not that I expect to get any, I’m just saying…it’s topical.)


Q1: What are your favorite types of comments to read on a webcomic?

Comments that catch stuff I missed. Especially helpful when there’s a code or puzzle…or a Dramatic Appearance by a character I totally forgot about, so I’m counting on more-avid readers to say “wow, it’s X’s sister we all thought was dead!”

That’s referring to other people’s webcomics, btw. I don’t forget about my own characters. (…usually.)


Q2: How can a reader craft a great comment?

I don’t want readers worrying about Greatness, I just want to hear from them. Even if it’s as simple as quoting a line that made you laugh and writing “LOL” afterward.

Trying to imagine the greatest possible comment, though…”I love your work, I told all my friends about it, these characters are my faves, here’s some fanart I drew, I just sent $10K via your PayPal Donate button, and would you like a book deal?”


Q3: Which platforms or systems do you find work best for commenting?

I like WordPress best. Disqus is useful for sites that don’t have a built-in system, but needs all kind of fussy Javascript to load properly. (Gonna go ahead and say Tumblr is worst.)

The personal feedback on Deviantart is nice, but it doesn’t give notifications for replies that aren’t directly to you, which makes it almost impossible to notice inter-reader conversations. And sometimes those are the best comments!


Q4: Are comments a necessity on webcomics? Why?

Well, uh, webcomics predate Web 2.0, so no.

(Kids these days don’t know how good they have it! Back when I got started, you could only “comment” by emailing the author, uphill in the snow both ways…)

Depends on how much moderating you’re able to do. Unless you hit a certain level of traffic, or a really dedicated army of trolls, it’s not hard to manually-approve all comments before they’re visible to the public.


Q5: How can a creator help foster a positive commenting community for their comics?

Be engaged and responsive, but don’t be too quick on the draw with Word Of God that stifles discussion and shuts down speculation.

(Lots of other people covered “set reasonable boundaries, and don’t be afraid to ban people who won’t respect them.” Although luckily I’ve only had to do that once. Or, technically, multiple times…but all for aliases of the same person, which only reinforces my conviction that they deserved to be banned in the first place.)

Expanding Beyond Webcomic Communities, for #WebcomicChat

Expanding Beyond Webcomic Communities, for #WebcomicChat published on 2 Comments on Expanding Beyond Webcomic Communities, for #WebcomicChat

I’ve been doing some of these chats realtime because my only answers were Tweet-sized anyway. Figured I’d compile them here for reference, and for ease of reading.

Q1: Do you stick to webcomic communities and services that cater to webcomics for promotion? How is your strategy working out?

Yeah, mostly. I have a constant 1-cent-or-less Project Wonderful campaign, and do intermittent more-expensive one using the best-performing ads. It’s a steady referral source.

A Project Wonderful screenshot — steady exposure, for about $0.83 per week. (The costs are all covered by my own site running ads like this.)

The trick IME is trying lots of different ads, introducing new ones every so often, and then looking at metrics to see which get the higher click rates.

And I make sure both BICP and Leif & Thorn are on resources like the LGBT Webcomics Link List.

Q2: What are some other options outside of webcomic communities for sharing your work?

Think about your genre & build on that. Mine are LGBT-centric, so I’m writing some posts for @LGBTQReads, to put a variety of recs in front of an audience that likes LGBT+ stuff but might not have thought about webcomics before.

(Here’s their Webcomics tag! One reclist is already posted, and there are more in the queue.)

Q3: What things make you nervous about sharing your comics outside of webcomic communities?

Yeah, this. It’s not like webcomic communities are magically nicer or better than the rest of the internet. Or like my strips are somehow inaccessible to a reader who’s never read webcomics before.

This is peak #relatable for all of us, I think.

Q4: What kinds of results have you had when talking to people about your comics outside of the webcomic communities? / Q5: What are resources that you have used outside of the webcomic niche to promote your webcomic?

Really just the stuff mentioned above. And when people IRL see me drawing, I tell them what it’s about, maybe give them the URL of the strip I’m working on.

Invariably, without fail, they say something like “oh, you’re so good, I can’t believe you’re not doing it full-time and making tons of money!”

…yeah, this is how you can tell someone isn’t familiar with webcomics.

Talking about detail for #WebcomicChat…well, trying to.

Talking about detail for #WebcomicChat…well, trying to. published on No Comments on Talking about detail for #WebcomicChat…well, trying to.

Q1: How do you feel about comics with incredibly detailed visual or story elements?

Deeply envious. If I wanted to draw comics in a minimalist style, a la 1/0 or xkcd, I could pull it off. But lush, elaborate, detailed art? Even if I tried, there’s only so high a mark I can hit.

Check out these establishing shots from Devil’s Candy, or these eldritch city environments from Zebra Girl, or this surreal interlude from Floraverse.

Q2: What sorts of things do you find necessary to put the most detail into?

Establishing shots — that is, a wide shot of the scenery when the characters enter a new environment. That’s what both of these are:

(The first one following a fourth-wall-straining metajoke about “gosh, this scenery would take forever to draw.”)

After that I make a conscious effort to put the characters in front of a simple background — various walls, rows of bushes and trees, a cave, the sky. In a black-and-white comic you can get away with just leaving blank white space around the characters, but in Leif & Thorn there needs to at least be a specific flat color.

(But I’m A Cat Person falls between the two (in a…grey area *rimshot*). It’s somewhat easier to cheat because I can fill the background with whatever shade of grey fits the lighting and tone of the scene, without having to keep track of which exact wall they’re in front of.)

It doesn’t save 100% of the work. You still need to keep your panels visually engaging by doing long shots, different angles, and other things that demand some thought for the background. But it cuts it down a lot.

Q3: How do you balance complicated details with simpler, more accessible details?

Mostly the common advice of “keep the characters/point-of-focus detailed and the background simple, so the focus stands out.”

Make your characters’ everyday outfits relatively simple and quick to draw, then give them more elaborate and complex clothes on special occasions.

Same with rare and fancy objects versus common ones. There are complex magical contraptions with engravings and swirly bits, but the smartcrystals they’re always using to make calls or browse the Network are just plain rectangles.

Q4: Do you have any time-saving techniques or resources for handling fine details?

Make yourself some stock graphics!

I finally made a nice tiled pattern for the embroidery on the trim of the knights’ uniforms, so I don’t have to draw random little fiddly bits every time. It’s just black lines on a white background, so I put it on a separate layer and set it to Multiply, and then it blends naturally with whatever shading or color-adjusting happens underneath.

And I have transparent graphics for the detailed art-nouveau Embassy gates. They can be resized, skewed, and otherwise distorted to match whatever angle the panel calls for.

Q5: What are your favorite comics that have immense amounts of detail?

The ones recced above, plus Homestuck (a ridiculous variety of planets and dreamscapes), Buying Time (cyberpunk settings and equipment complete with cycling Flash animation), and Serenity Rose (spooky midwestern town and supernatural environments).

Readers, what are yours? (And/or, what’s your favorite high-detail Leif & Thorn scene?)

The latest in #WebcomicChat — cameos!

The latest in #WebcomicChat — cameos! published on No Comments on The latest in #WebcomicChat — cameos!

Today’s topic is cameos!

Used to do them all the time in And Shine Heaven Now. They have their own tag on the new Shine site.

Mostly in Leif & Thorn I’ll only do cameos from But I’m A Cat Person, and vice versa. But if there’s a big crowd scene, sometimes you want to make it interesting.

Q1: Have you ever used other comic creators’ characters as cameos in your comic? If not, would you?

Not characters from webcomics specifically (I don’t think). At least, not yet. Characters from other media, sure.

Speaking as a reader, they’re a really fun Easter egg to catch. Rereading Bruno the Bandit recently, I was all entertained to spot some cameos from Sluggy Freelance. In an intra-artist example, Sleepless Domain borrows some characters from the same author’s Kiwi Blitz to fill out magical-girl crowds.

Q2: How do you usually go about adding cameos – ask people, request cameos, or just add them as a fun surprise?

Fun surprise!

If it’s a quick background appearance, I don’t think you should ask. The goal is to show your appreciation for the other creator’s work, not get their approval for yours. (Copyright-wise, you’re fine here — look up the YoI cameos in the Steven Universe comics, or Sailor Moon characters in the background of My Little Pony issues, for examples.)

If it’s a long-term use of someone else’s character, then either it’s some kind of planned crossover/tie-in (in which case, both creators should be discussing it), or it’s a fancomic (in which case, do whatever you want! — just don’t sell it). Or it’s a mid-line case, like Phil Likes Tacos — an original comic, but with so many sci-fi and video-game cameos that the artist has consciously decided not to put it up for sale.

Q3: What are the upsides to using cameos of other people’s characters?

It gives you a break from drawing your own designs, lets you branch out a little.

It livens up boring crowd scenes.

It’s a small way of showing your appreciation for the other person’s work.

If you’re lucky, they see it and like you back and link their followers to your strip — but don’t make that your goal. There’s an episode of the Webcomics Weekly podcast where the artist of (iirc) PVP complained about how many “look, I gave your character a cameo!” emails he gets that are clearly just shilling for links. That’s just rude.

Q4: What are the downsides to using cameos of other people’s characters, if any?

Well, if you’re rude about it, the creator you admire is going to feel annoyed rather than appreciated.

And if you overuse the cameos, it limits your ability to sell the comic. (Only a downside if you were hoping to sell the comic in the first place. If you’re just here for the fun of the hobby, it’s all good.)

Some people are probably going to answer this with “it limits your creativity and gets in the way of developing your own characters,” but, listen, if making comics with 100% other people’s characters is fun and entertaining for you, go for it. Four King Hell and Powerpuff Girls Doujinshi are pure fancomic, and they’re delightful. Have fun.

Q5: Share a page where you have used cameo characters!

This L&T strip has gay skaters on the left, Magic Tavern podcasters on the right:

Read the whole storyline to pick out others! Including the Leverage crew, apparently stealing a Summerfest.

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