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Let Me In 8/29

Let Me In 8/29 published on 10 Comments on Let Me In 8/29

Hey look, some commentary.

(I went and wrapped up the year-long Sønheim pandemic storyline, but the real-world pandemic didn’t have the decency to end, so I’ve gotta work these feelings out somehow.)


Lulen: “Acute”? Are they sick? And what do they expect us to do here?

Alruna: “Dysphoria”? This I do not need in my life again!

Thorn: No panic. Ceanska medics can treat it. But! First, you need to ask . . .

Pedestrian: Yes, I have the Whispers! It’s serious! Could be terminal!

Alruna: And you know this from which doctor?

Pedestrian: Hah! You can’t trust doctors. I went on the net and got all the information I needed to diagnose myself!

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10 Comments

I prefer the people who look up their symptoms on the net and self isolate with out asking a doctor first over someone who takes a cough supresent and goes on with their day.
And going to the local ER might not be great, hospitals might beover welmed or test could be scarce. I took a covid test in April 2020 and September 2021 for $200 each, I’ve heard that test costs have decreased since then.
But WebMD is a blessing and a curse and this is a real problem.

“You’re perfectly healthy. It’s just nothing matters. You’re not good enough for something to matter.”

There aren’t many conditions out there for which a positive self-diagnosis is basically always wrong, but I think this is one of them.

That having been said, I wouldn’t call it a symptom, unless I have a symptom of the Whispers. I think it’s details like this where doctors prefer the term “diagnostic criteria” over “symptoms”, because symptoms have too much of a connotation of “you have these and you have the illness”, where “diagnostic criteria” can be more nuanced. Sure, they’re synonymous, it’s just that one of them is opaque and doesn’t have as many connotations associated with it because people don’t *use* it.

Well, with the information from yesterday that “Officials believe the spread was limited, and the infected spirits have all been isolated” and the reaction of this person in particular there is panic involved.

Nevertheless I don’t think it would be right to put them down as “just overreacting”. We still don’t know what they or the others in this group know about the actual threat.

Sure they might be misinformed, but based on the sentence “You can’t trust doctors.” I would guess that the information which would make them realize they are overreacting are freely and readily available, they just decided to not trust them.

True, their problem is not “why are they seeking help for a legitimate bad situation that they can’t personally confirm is over?” so much as “why are they seeking something that won’t actually help?”

It’s like the people who heard about covid and went “wow, this is dangerous, so…I need to start taking horse dewormer! The pet store is immorally withholding medical treatment if they won’t sell me horse dewormer.”

I suspect the reason many of them sought something that wouldn’t actually help is people like my ex-father-in-law. When asked a question that he as no reason to know the answer to, and he thinks the person who is asking the question has a reason to recognize that, he doesn’t say, “I don’t know.” Instead, he comes up with a sarcastic response that he thinks will fool nobody. Unfortunately, he deadpans it so well that he fools a lot more people than he expects.

I’ve also met others who are… less benign. Two of my associates in college would be annoyed at being asked questions like that, so they’d deliberately give misleading answers with an intent of punishing the people who felt it was worth bothering them with the question.

In neither case did it matter whether the person asking the original question was doing it rhetorically or not. “Ask a stupid question, get a stupid answer.”

Then there’s the people who say stuff like, “and when they find out what actually cures this, it’ll be something completely off the wall that nobody expects, like horse dewormer”. That’s not even attempting to say what the cure would be, it’s just giving an example. But people who are panicking about stuff don’t think logically, and they’ll still sometimes grasp that and now they’re demanding horse dewormer.

To be clear, younger me fell in the last set of possible sources, except that I learned before SARS2 was a thing, so I wasn’t one of the people who perpetrated the idea of idiotic cures… about this one, at least. Also, I am very, very sorry to all of the people who I knew who were panicking about Ebola and listened to my assertion that it could take an off-the-wall cure and took anti-heartworm medication for it because I used that as an example. At least nobody died from my hypothetical off-the-wall cure.

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