Skip to content

Sink or Swim 19/29

Sink or Swim 19/29 published on 7 Comments on Sink or Swim 19/29


Thorn: Leif being “owned” is about him paying off a debt, okay?

If he ever had kids, the debt would be passed on to them. Even after his death. So the option is just not on the table.

There’s a local political movement in Sønheim to reform those laws . . .

. . . and I support them when I can. But they haven’t won yet.

Comment Header

7 Comments

Thorn is telling lil Thorn more than I expected. Also, I hope Lil Thorn becomes suspicious about Leif’s “work study” program.
I wonder how who pays for what breaks down.
I wonder if there are two rates. the ‘market rate’: how much companies pay to ‘own’ your debt which is much less than paying off the whole debt in full.
Maybe with most companies, it isn’t posible to ‘work off’ your debt, maybe the amount going towards your debt is 1/1000th of what a citizen would make doing a similar job, maybe most companies deducting your entire salary’s worth of living expenses.
Otherwise I don’t see how Rocky Rapids could afford to buy Leif with out taking on debt themselves

I, too, have automatic suspicions about the usual “company town” scams – maybe he *is* getting charged for food, rent, laundry, training, medical care, and “financial administration fees” – he’s not going to check; the total will always be $TRAUMA.BADTIMES – but I have vague memories *most* of those are regulated or illegal under Sonheim law

IIRC, the Sønheim GOVERNMENT owns Leif’s debt, and when he was working at Rocky Rapids as training.

Also, as far as we (and the Sønska public) know. most people who go into Sønheim debt-servitude DO regain their citizenship. (See Elisa and Leif’s friends with benefits) Leif’s just under a level of debt that would put a dent in the budget of most mid-sized towns, if not wipe them out entirely. Assuming Leif earns an average wage for a landscape specialist, he’s likely actually chipping the debt down, bit by bit, but the usurious principal means most of his pay goes to the interest, with only a sliver going to the principal..

That said, I’d guess that Jay is right, and Leif is getting charged for food, rent, laundry, training, medical care, financial administrative fees, and anything else they can come up with, as well as not getting paid as much for his primary duties as they’d pay a citizen to do the same work (as if they’d ever have a citizen doing that work.)

I’d guess that the only time a substantial amount of the money Leif makes goes to paying down the debt is when he’s rented.

While you may be technically right (meaning Leif is getting charged for food, rent, laundry, training, medical care, financial administrative fees, and anything else they can come up with, as well as not getting paid as much for his primary duties as they’d pay a citizen to do the same work) I don’t think it’s SO bad: The terms are reasonable for most people (the ones who are only in servitude temporarily) and Leif is not being charged more just because he’s unlikely to verify his debt.

The main problem and the thing different for Leif would be the fact that his debt is huge and therefore the interest is huge, and he’s mostly paying the interest, as Smallmoon said. Which means that yes, the only time a substantial amount of the money Leif makes goes to paying down the debt is when he’s rented.

From what I can tell, once a debt goes to Servitude there’s no more interest. My speculation as to the details follows:

Because servants can’t negotiate for themselves, I infer that all servant wages are propped up by the government. The simplest way to implement that is to have all servants owned by the government, which is expected to rent them at the best wage it can find. So, at bankruptcy Sønheim cashes out the original creditor, and takes responsibility for extracting that value from the victim. Private “employers” pay to and charge from the servant’s account with the state, and so the party holding the debt and the party paying for the servant are not the same.

When the “employer” is the government, the theory may be that the department that administrates servants has a separate budget from the running embassies department, but that’s theoretical.

Another speculation: When Leif says that “Szélanya was the Queen who ordered that everyone in Sønheim must be paid what they’re worth” that probably means she set up the first iteration of Sønheim’s debt system with an agent negotiating servant wages.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Primary Sidebar